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REVIEWS FOR TOUCHING THE WIRE - Rebecca Bryn

AMAZON REVIEWS FOR TOUCHING THE WIRE - REBECCA BRYN

What fabulous reviews - thank you all so much. Your feedback is really appreciated.

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Readers' Favourite 5-star review, won the Christoph Fischer award for Best Historical Thriller of 2015.

Mrs. Pamela Fowler "pjay" reviewed TOUCHING THE WIRE: A doctor and nurse fight to save lives, and find love in a Nazi death-camp....

Wow 1 July 2015

Could not put this down, my eyes were sore from reading as I read it in one day. It gripped me from start to finish. Well done Rebecca, I am just waiting for your next book

Fil 5*A masterpiece 12 May 2015

This is Rebecca's second novel and even better than the first! Again the human mystery at its core drove me to finish reading it in double quick time. A multiplicity of complex twists and turns in the plot had me guessing until very close to its end. Don't expect her books to last you weeks - more like hours or days at the most!

Again some of her characters are far from admirable, even downright evil, but she carefully explores human behaviour under absolutely intolerable circumstances and delivers a compellingly believable yarn that is clearly thoroughly researched on every front and challenges the reader to review their preconceived convictions. A masterpiece!

5* Uniquely interesting, entertaining, and informative May 11, 2015

The atrocities that went on in Auschwitz have been well documented, as has the horror of the capability of human beings toward one another. This book depicts the story of what was endured by those imprisoned in flashbacks from the perspective of a survivor of that concentration camp, and then from his granddaughter as she embarks on a quest to uncover his truth.

But it is the telling of the story, the writing and the characters created by the author that produce a work that is uniquely interesting, entertaining, and informative, not just from the perspective of those incredible events, but of the later determination of a young woman to understand, while dealing with her own struggle to find her way in life.

Touching The Wire is a well written, thought provoking five star read. Highly recommended.

http://www.ebooklister.net/listing/27118.html



5 star This writer is one to watch - better still, one to read!

ByCM Bainton-Smithon March 26, 2015

Format: Paperback

What an astonishing book! So often with self-published works one is distracted by poor writing, endless typos, dreadful plotting and grammatical errors, but not here, my goodness no! Rebecca has taken on a difficult subject and produced a challenging, but ultimately human story of love, loss and redemption. From the word go, one is assured that the writer knows exactly what she is doing as she takes us on a journey which reeks with authenticity and which skilfully engages all human emotion. It is not my way in these reviews to disclose either plot or style, but what I can say is that the reader is in for a real treat as they follow the twists and turns that Rebecca's character's engage in. What can I say? Well, this is a wonderful read and I cannot recommend it highly enough! This is one hot writer and I eagerly await her next offering. Read it - I'm sure you will feel the same!

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful

Brilliantly challenging, March 22, 2015

By

booklover

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This review is from: TOUCHING THE WIRE: A doctor and nurse fight to save lives, and find love in a Nazi death-camp. Seventy years later the doctor's granddaughter, intrigued by an enigmatic carving, discovers the secrets (Kindle Edition)

This is a book with so many different layers it seems impossible to include them all in a review and do them all justice. It is a deeply touching, deeply moving story that is difficult to read at times, but gripping, mercilessly engaging, and you simply cannot put it down.

The setting and the historical background could be a double-edged sword in this case, since there have been so may works set in the time of World War II, but Bryn managed to create a masterpiece based on the eternal struggles of the human soul, the decisions, the burdens, and the memories that are forever in charge.

I liked the structure of the book, and the fact that the intertwining of the past and the present felt natural, which is one of the things that prove Bryn is an outstanding author. But the technical elements of a book are never what convinces me that what I'm reading is a great work - it is the stories in the story that I want to feel, and when an author manages to combine so many intricately described and deeply disturbing events that are stories themselves into the main story, I am convinced I have chosen well.

Touching the Wire challenges you to look deeper and think about questions that cannot be answered simply (if at all), which makes it a difficult book to read at times, but then again, the wire is all around us and only those who dared to touch it can claim to have lived.

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful

Powerful, 15 Mar. 2015

By

ChristophFischerBooks "Chris"

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This review is from: TOUCHING THE WIRE: A doctor and nurse fight to save lives, and find love in a Nazi death-camp. Seventy years later the doctor's granddaughter, intrigued by an enigmatic carving, discovers the secrets (Kindle Edition)

"Touching the Wire" by Rebecca Bryn is a heavy and at times difficult read. The location is a death camp in Poland 1940 and the author spares us little to show the gruesomeness that is camp life. This is the strength of the first part. Much of the literature about the time glosses over and makes us shed a tear. Bryn is more truthful, yet then manages to weave in a love story between an inmate and a young doctor. Very powerful and impressive with lots to think about and reflect upon.

Then forward to present day England where the granddaughter of the doctor delves into the past. When I saw the second part I thought I knew where this would be going but Bryn does an excellent job at bringing the halves together.

A great read I would definitely recommend.

A magnificent story of loss and love, 10 Mar. 2015

By

Lesley Hayes

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This review is from: TOUCHING THE WIRE: A doctor and nurse fight to save lives, and find love in a Nazi death-camp. Seventy years later the doctor's granddaughter, intrigued by an enigmatic carving, discovers the secrets (Kindle Edition)

It seems strange to say 'I really loved this' about a book that is at times so harrowing a read - but I did. It is beautifully written, as well as being a carefully constructed narrative that keeps the reader completely engaged through both the first and the second part of the book. I won't reiterate the synopsis as it gives any potential reader enough of an idea of what the overall story is about. Instead, I'd like to focus on the effect of the book, and the masterly way in which the author evokes pity, horror, disgust, apprehension, and ultimately a form of compassionate redemption. The final section brings together the strands left hanging at the end of the first part, when as readers we do not know the true outcome of Walt and Miriam's tragic relationship in Auschwitz. There are certain questions that it takes the whole of the second half of the book to uncover, like a crossword with too few clues, or a jigsaw puzzle - an apt metaphor that is carried through in pursuing the meaning in the enigmatic carving that is mentioned in the synopsis. There are also cleverly drawn parallels between the past and the present concerning the ethical dilemmas that arise in the keeping of secrets and the fear-based collusion with a bully, in whatever form he shows up. We are taken on an important journey throughout this novel, along with the characters themselves - a journey of insight for them as well as for us. And those characters are so real that I found myself constantly thinking: “This must be a true story" and then realising, moved to tears, that it is indeed the true story of so many individuals and families cursed by the evil actions and events that took place in Nazi extermination camps throughout The Holocaust. Rebecca Bryn holds nothing back in her stark, factual descriptions, and the deliberate lack of sentimental emotion in reporting those images make them all the more affecting - these atrocities really did occur, just as reported. The significance of the title becomes apparent at several points in the narrative, but most poignantly at the very end. There is so much that is explored in this book about abuse, betrayal, loyalty, forgiveness and the real meaning and intention of love that it would be impossible to itemise them and would also feel like taking the wings off a butterfly. Read the book for yourself - be moved, as I was, and bear witness to the unbearable, keeping alight some flame of hope in your heart.


ADH64 reviewed

TOUCHING THE WIRE: A doctor and nurse fight to save lives, and find love in a Nazi death-camp....

An exceptional and important book 5 March 2015

A marvellous yet disturbing read. There are shocking elements to it, unsurprsingly considering the subject matter. But through it all shines an indefatigable humanity. Set in Auschwitz during WW11 the many secrets Walt, the main protagonist, has been keeping slowly emerge through his inqu

isitive and persistent grandaughter Charlotte. I was gripped right to the end. I highly recommend this exceptional, and important, book.

***** Max Power on Goodreads

The book opens with a quote from the great Irish writer orator and statesman Edmund Burke.. "triumph of evil is that good men do nothing"... and it is an apt opening to set the scene for this terrific book. I am hard to please sometimes, but here Rebecca has written a book that is so stylised, clearly well researched but most importantly a book that tells a ripping tale that I was engrossed in from start to finish.

A tale split in two from war torn Germany to present day, the way in which she switches back and forth creates the perfect tension that kept me deciding to read 'just one more chapter.' It is one f my favourite tactics employed by some writers, but it can fall flat on its face if not balanced and engaging. As always, no plot spoilers from me. I have read a lot of books in the past few months and for me this one is competes at the top end in terms of quality and in particular, engagement. Loved it and will have to go back to the Rebecca Bryn well again. Pick this one up.

*****Diana J Febry

An exceptional book, with universal appeal.

A character driven book with elements of mystery and romance but at its heart, some quite controversial and thought provoking issues.

We meet Walt as a devoted grandfather, father and husband, suffering from horrendous nightmares and flash backs to his time in Auschwitz during WW11. We learn how Walt saved a young Jewish girl from the gas chambers, falls in love and secretly marries her. We hear of his efforts to save people within the camp and how he passes messages for the resistance movement. But little by little, we learn of his darker memories (spoiler)

Years later, Charlotte discovers a strange carving, made by her grandfather, containing lockets of hair, candles and a strange message. With her marriage failing she becomes determined to solve the riddle and discover the secret her grandfather kept locked up, for so long.

The story is at times harrowing and often gripping. The characters felt so real, I could feel their pain, in-decision and shame. The ending was powerful and re confirmed the lessons learnt are often not heeded, by nations or individuals (spoiler)

If I had to say something negative about this book, I'd say it did take a few chapters to really get started. However, the feast that lay beyond was well worth it!

Brilliantly written book. I highly recommend it.

An exceptional book, with universal appeal.

A character driven book with elements of mystery and romance but at its heart, some quite controversial and thought provoking issues.

We meet Walt as a devoted grandfather, father and husband, suffering from horrendous nightmares and flash backs to his time in Auschwitz during WW11. We learn how Walt saved a young Jewish girl from the gas chambers, falls in love and secretly marries her. We hear of his efforts to save people within the camp and how he passes messages for the resistance movement. But little by little, we learn of his darker memories. For Walt was not an innocent prisoner. He was the young doctor in charge of the infirmary and assisted in macabre experiments.

Years later, Charlotte discovers a strange carving, made by her grandfather, containing lockets of hair, candles and a strange message. With her marriage failing she becomes determined to solve the riddle and discover the secret her grandfather kept locked up, for so long.

The story is at times harrowing and often gripping. The characters felt so real, I could feel their pain, in-decision and shame. The ending was powerful and re confirmed the lessons learnt are often not heeded, by nations or individuals.

One short scene, that summed up the book for me -

Walt (Chuck) delivers a baby and immediately suffocates it. If the guards had discovered the pregnancy and birth, mother & child would have been burnt alive. That's some Hobson's choice.


Brilliantly written book. I highly recommend it.

5* review.

Harrowing. Horrifying. Powerful. Touching the Wire by Rebecca Bryn is a masterful and thought-provoking story, a truly amazing read.

Rebecca Bryn is an outstanding author, her writing is of a high calibre and she is a wonderful story teller. Her writing transports you to the scene and immerses you in it. I wasn't reading a story - I was there, living it, every second of it. It is horrific and shocking and will leave you wondering how such evil existed, but at the same time it is full of love and warmth - a true love story even amongst death.

In Part II Rebecca whisks you in to the present time, to another love story and to a challenging mystery. Can Charlotte unravel her beloved grandfather's past from the clues he has left and will she have the courage to divulge the truth?

War crimes are not a subject I would normally choose to read about, but Touching the Wire - written to commemorate the seventieth anniversary of Holocaust Memorial Day on 27 January 2015 - is not your normal war story.

Rebecca has amazing talent: I can't wait to read her other novel, Silence of the Stones.

5 stars Brilliant - Heartbreaking Novel, 21 Jan. 2015

By

Deborah Mitton - See all my reviews

This review is from: TOUCHING THE WIRE: A doctor and nurse fight to save lives, and find love in a Nazi death-camp. Seventy years later the doctor's granddaughter, intrigued by an enigmatic carving, discovers the secrets (Kindle Edition)

A beautiful - heartbreaking novel! This is the second novel of Rebecca I have read. There is no comparison between the two.

Touching the Wire is one of the best book I have read in my life. Be prepared to have your heart pulled out of your chest and stepped on. You mind and soul will be on a roller coaster ride of heartbreak and despair.

I think it was the descriptions Rebecca has given / you can picture so vividly in your mind and you know that many of the events really happened.

Ask yourself this question - is there anything you couldn't forgive - from a person you loved.

Thanks Rebecca for a wonderful experience.

5.0 out of 5 stars Complex and Brilliant - A Stunning Piece of Fiction., January 18, 2015

By

LB Johnson (Midwest) - See all my reviews

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I bought this book early today, and just finished it in one sitting, dinner still waiting. Author Rebecca Bryn weaves different characters, different cultures, and different generations in the same chapter, effortlessly. A more detailed look at flawed souls and burning hearts I've not read in a long time. Coupling a mystery within history, I literally was unable to put it down and am failing to find the words to convey how much it touched me. "The truth shall be uncovered, and I pray for those I love: Auribus teneo lupum". LB Johnson - Author of The Book of Barkley

5 stars Highly recommended, 19 Jan. 2015

This is a touching and very sensitively told story spanning many decades starting in the concentration camps of WW2. As a rule I don't enjoy war stories or their spin-offs but this was so carefully told without glossing over the details but also without revelling in them I found myself thoroughly enjoying it despite it's subject matter. Congratulations to the Author Rebecca Bryn for creating such an emotional and spiritual account of a very painful subject. Highly recommended.

5 stars Reality and fiction are never far away. Well structured, well written and gripping story ! full of twists.

5.0 out of 5 stars This book was recommended by a friend and now I know why, 11 Jan. 2015

By

Linnette H. - See all my reviews

This review is from: TOUCHING THE WIRE: A doctor and nurse fight to save lives, and find love in a Nazi death-camp. Seventy years later the doctor's granddaughter, intrigued by an enigmatic carving, discovers the secrets (Kindle Edition)

The atrocities of WWII are never something I look forward to reading, though I know the history of Europe inside out.

This book was recommended by a friend and now I know why.

Touching The Wire is a true psychological drama, mystery, and romance, all in one. It is without a doubt one of the best fictional books in this genre - well researched, stimulating and engaging.

The characters are all but jumping off the pages, complete with flaws and capabilities we expect we find real people.

The dialogue feels real, with some occasional translation, but this doesn't distract the reader.

The plot is well researched, some scenes are graphic, but it is done extremely well.

It starts in a death camp in 1940's Poland and the story jumps back and forth between an old man's post war memories and his devastating firsthand experiences within the Jewish concentration camps of World War Two.

The author sets up part two of the book by using the old man's flashbacks while crafting several woodcarvings in preparation for his post-death recovery.

Part two of the book is set in present-day England when the old man's adult granddaughter stumbles across one of his carvings, and she becomes determined to find the rest and to understand their combined meaning but in the process she uncovers shocking secrets about the gentle, loving, man whom she knew as her grandfather.

All and all, very well written book using Jewish Holocaust as its setting.

5 stars Clenching, January 7, 2015

By Mom of 5

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This review is from: TOUCHING THE WIRE: A doctor and nurse fight to save lives, and find love in a Nazi death-camp. Seventy years later the doctor's granddaughter, intrigued by an enigmatic carving, discovers the secrets (Kindle Edition)

To be able to not shed a tear is not even close. Touching the Wire is full of learning about oneself. Forgiving pasts to protect the present n future love one's. Amazing true history.

5.0 out of 5 stars A well written character-driven cross genre novel that doesn't fail to keep one's interest throughout., January 1, 2015

By

Michael - See all my reviews

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This review is from: TOUCHING THE WIRE: A doctor and nurse fight to save lives, and find love in a Nazi death-camp. Seventy years later the doctor's granddaughter, intrigued by an enigmatic carving, discovers the secrets (Kindle Edition)

Once in a while I'll read an indie novel and feel strongly that it was the author's choice to independently publish, and Touching the Wire is one of those novels.

This very well written and well researched novel by Rebecca Bryn deals with the horrifying subject of the Jewish Holocaust as the background to the mystery and romance to come.

Told in two parts, the first masterfully jumps back and forth between an old man's post war family and his shocking firsthand experiences within the best known and infamous of the many wired walled Jewish concentration camps of World War Two. But there is an interesting take to his experiences: It's from the administrative side. Written more in the style of literary/historical fiction genre, Rebecca Bryn doesn't hold back as she sets up part two by describing the camp life and a rare love found there using the old man's flashbacks as he applies his craft of woodworking in preparation for his post-death redemption.

Where in part one Bryn continually causes the reader to ask questions regarding the purpose of the mysterious carvings the old man is creating, in part two, she gradually and masterfully answers them all as the story turns into the mystery/romance genre. When the old man's then adult granddaughter stumbles across one of several of his carvings, her curiosity is aroused, and perhaps as an escape from her marriage's poor situation, she becomes determined to find the rest and to understand their combined meaning.

In the true mystery sense, Bryn takes the reader on a journey of discovery, sometimes shocking them and at other times requiring a wiping of a tear, as more and more of the puzzle is put together to finally reveal that not all the granddaughter had known is as it was.

It's rare to find a novel that keeps my interest at every sentence, but this was one.

Five Stars At once haunting and scintillating. Ms. Bryn's talent ..., December 24, 2014

By

Scott W. Barger

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This review is from: TOUCHING THE WIRE: A doctor and nurse fight to save lives, and find love in a Nazi death-camp. Seventy years later the doctor's granddaughter, intrigued by an enigmatic carving, discovers the secrets (Kindle Edition)

At once haunting and scintillating. Ms. Bryn's talent as a storyteller shines through at every turn. It requires a deft literary command and control to do justice to a subject matter that displays the depravity possible in our race's history, while turning that same darkness into a genuinely delightful book.

Congratulations on your artistic achievement.

FIVE STARS 23.12.14 Triumphant first novel

Review of Touching the Wire by Rebecca Bryn

Not your average Holocaust story

The story of the Holocaust is a terrifying reminder of what depths humans can plumb when they really set their minds to being evil. It's a loathsome, offensive story that should forever remain in our psyches. The numbers are staggering and the sheer industrialization of torture and murder is mind boggling.

We all know this.

The horrifying event has been the subject of many written works, both good and bad. It's the go-to source for hacks who want to shock and the first stop for anyone who wants to make you feel bad. In the hands of a mediocre writer you get a few tears, some shocks, and move on with your life.

In the hands of a good writer, however, you find a compelling story. Instead of cardboard cutouts or caricatures you get people with all their inconsistencies and warts. A good writer can do the subject justice. Rebecca Bryn is a good writer and this is a good story. There is some of the shock and awe you would expect but rather than relying on the events to drive the story forward, she relies on the characters - their motivations and their sheer humanity - to drive the story forward. So what you wind up with is a story of people set during the Holocaust rather than a story of the Holocaust with some people in it.

This is a triumphant first novel from a talented author who I sincerely hope will go on to write more.

5.0 out of 5 stars Spectacular!, December 21, 2014

By

morgan - See all my reviews

This review is from: TOUCHING THE WIRE: A doctor and nurse fight to save lives, and find love in a Nazi death-camp. Seventy years later the doctor's granddaughter, intrigued by an enigmatic carving, discovers the secrets (Kindle Edition)

Where to begin?

This was an amazing story.

Immediately, i fell into the rhythm of the tale, and lost track of all time. Before long, i found myself toward the final pages, wishing it wouldn't end.

That's the ONLY disappointing thing about this book. The author would have held my attention for a thousand more pages.

Thank you, Rebecca Bryn for a spectacular story.

It touched, moved, and delighted me, and in today's day and age, that's not an easy task.

Now, please write more!

You have a fan for life.

http://www.amazon.com/TOUCHING-THE-WIRE-death-camp-granddaughter-ebook/product-reviews/B00MX5TRPY/ref=cm_cr_pr_top_recent?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=0&sortBy=bySubmissionDateDescending

Amazon review

5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding storytelling, December 15, 2014

By

Mr. T. Benson "Tom Benson" (Northeast England, UK)

TOUCHING THE WIRE by Rebecca Bryn

This is without doubt one of the best fictional tales of this type I've read. One of the main characters is brought to the reader in the modern day, complete with the nightmares of his past experiences in war-torn Germany. His demons are not confined to the night, so the narrative opens his mental sores to expose a myriad of deep secrets. His conscious mind is torn by day and night by vivid memories.

I've read several factual accounts of the history which the author has used for the core of her story. Rebecca has included activities of not only Nazi soldiers, but also the prisoners themselves and the vile activities of one of the most hated mass-murderers of modern times; Dr Josef Mengele.

I served in the modern Germany for many years and know the deep shame and regret that the more recent generations of German people feel for the actions of some of their forefathers.

When you've walked around the mass graves of Bergen-Belsen and visited the Jewish History Museum of Berlin, or Amsterdam, you begin to sense the true horror of what happened to so many innocent people. They suffered and died needlessly.

This story unwinds in two parts. The first half of the story takes us back and forward from present day to the horror. The constant rebounding enables us to see the atrocities through the eyes of a prisoner, who is also a doctor. It is he who must deal with his demons. The second part of the story is played out as a mystery/suspense which unfolds like the petals of a rose, one layer after another to a blossoming end.

The dialogue is worked with an occasional translation, but this doesn't affect the entertainment for the reader. Many scenes are of a graphic nature, so be prepared to be shocked. The imagery, like the dialogue is done extremely well. I congratulate Rebecca on not only her writing and storytelling prowess, but also her outstanding research.

Link http://www.amazon.com/TOUCHING-THE-WIRE-death-camp-granddaughter-ebook/product-reviews/B00MX5TRPY/ref=pr_all_summary_cm_cr_acr_txt?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=1&sortBy=bySubmissionDateDescending

****

5.0 out of 5 stars Rebecca Bryn's second book: even more incredible than the brilliant "The Silence of the Stones.", November 5, 2014

By

peaches345 - See all my reviews

This review is from: TOUCHING THE WIRE: A doctor and nurse fight to save lives, and find love in a Nazi death-camp. Seventy years later the doctor's granddaughter, intrigued by an enigmatic carving, discovers the secrets (Kindle Edition)

A challenging read from the first page and the pace through part one never lets up as Walt and Miriam struggle for survival, in love against the horrific background of Auschwitz where it is easier to die than to live . Contemporary part two lulls the reader into thinking easier times are ahead, but not for long as Walt's granddaughter uncovers shocking secrets about the gentle man who gave her a loving, secure, childhood.


I had this book on pre-order cos I read The Silence of the Stones and loved it.

It's beautiful and horrible both at the same time and I'm not sure how Rebecca did that.

I've sent for two printed copies, one for me and one to pass round to friends - it's THAT good!

Saying anymore would spoil it for everybody but DON'T MISS IT - and have you looked at her website? There's a load of stuff on there from her NEXT book and it is SO different.

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This review is from: TOUCHING THE WIRE: A doctor and nurse fight to save lives, and find love in a Nazi death-camp. Seventy years later the doctor's granddaughter, intrigued by an enigmatic carving, discovers the secrets (Kindle Edition)

This has to be the most evocative novel about the holocaust ever written, and it is so readable. A love story against the odds between a doctor and nurse in Auschwitz, made bearable by admiration for their courage and sympathy for human weaknesses. Part Two is almost contemporary, featuring a young woman's quest for the truth about what happened and the eternal question, can such appalling sins be forgiven? Could the doctor and nurse forgive? The young woman with the burden of secrets? Can you? I'm not sure of my answer to that question: I do know this book moved me to tears and, amazingly, sometimes to laughter.


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